blackfoxx:

smileshidemymisery:

ravenrobintt:

derpslife:

ravenrobintt:

my sister just informed me that if you say “rise up lights” you’ll sound like an austrailian saying “razor blades” my life will never be the same

also if you say “beer can” in a british accent it sounds like “bacon” with a bad jamaican accent

JESUS. CHRIST.

I’m British and I’ve just realised you’re right.. 

i love these

(Source: thatxxjiyong-ssi)

truetomizzou:

So True.
bijoux-et-mineraux:

Green and Purple Octahedral Fluorite on Quartz

bijoux-et-mineraux:

Green and Purple Octahedral Fluorite on Quartz

(via mineralists)

knowledgeequalsblackpower:

eternallybeautifullyblack:

Stripes but no Stars” -Thomas H. Lindsey, 1892“When slavery was legally abolished, the Slave Codes were rewritten as the Black Codes, a series of laws criminalizing legal activity for African Americans. Through the enforcement of these laws, acts such as standing in one area of town or walking at night, for example, became the criminal acts of “loitering” or “breaking curfew” for which African Americans were imprisoned. In the late 19th-century South, an extensive prison system was developed in the interest of maintaining the power, race, and economic relationships of slavery.”“—Julie Browne, “The Labor of Doing Time,” first published in Criminal Injustice: Confronting the Prison Crisis (Prison Activist Resource Center).”
Image and commentary via African Heritage City.

Bolded for emphasis! 

knowledgeequalsblackpower:

eternallybeautifullyblack:

Stripes but no Stars” -Thomas H. Lindsey, 1892

“When slavery was legally abolished, the Slave Codes were rewritten as the Black Codes, a series of laws criminalizing legal activity for African Americans. Through the enforcement of these laws, acts such as standing in one area of town or walking at night, for example, became the criminal acts of “loitering” or “breaking curfew” for which African Americans were imprisoned. In the late 19th-century South, an extensive prison system was developed in the interest of maintaining the power, race, and economic relationships of slavery.”

“—Julie Browne, “The Labor of Doing Time,” first published in Criminal Injustice: Confronting the Prison Crisis (Prison Activist Resource Center).”

Image and commentary via African Heritage City.

Bolded for emphasis! 

(via pumpkinthot)

theantikeychop:

Alex Haley, author of Roots, at the typewriter with Malcolm X.
The Antikey Chop

theantikeychop:

Alex Haley, author of Roots, at the typewriter with Malcolm X.

The Antikey Chop

(via pumpkinthot)

kalamu:

VIDEO: Sarraounia (une reine Africaine) > Dynamic Africa    
http://t.co/9lbEiu7H

kalamu:

VIDEO: Sarraounia (une reine Africaine) > Dynamic Africa    

http://t.co/9lbEiu7H

(via praisethelorde-deactivated20141)

Some people say all black people look alike, we call those people, “Police”

Dave Chappelle (via spizikespiegel)

YASS!

(via kammstheace)

(Source: exiledgod, via fyeahcracker)

Colonialism is the massive fog that has clouded our imaginations regarding who we could be, excised our memories of who we once were, and numbed our understanding of our current existence.
Waziyatawin, a Dakota writer, teacher, and activist from the Pezihutazizi Otunwe (Yellow Medicine Village) in southwestern Minnesota. (via mughalmoney)

(via talesofthestarshipregeneration)

naynayunicorn:

thetpr:

Young James Earl Jones

James was fine!

naynayunicorn:

thetpr:

Young James Earl Jones

James was fine!

(Source: t-iman, via posttragicmulatto-deactivated20)

mineralogy-porn:

Chatoyant stones, including elbaites, scapolites, and beryls, from the National Gem Collection

mineralogy-porn:

Chatoyant stones, including elbaites, scapolites, and beryls, from the National Gem Collection

(via mineralists)