Thrift Store Clothing

ladymaxwell:

Whenever people act disgusted with the idea of a thrift store it honestly degrades how I see them. One, because these people have exaggerated ideas of what the clothes at thrift stores look like and consist of, thinking they’ll get some kind of infectious rash or something.  Two, because you are NOT so important that you need a brand new one of everything. How self-centered is that anyways? A lot of garments outlast however long their original buyer wants them. I know in my life I’ve given away A LOT of clothes that are perfectly fine I just grew out of them or something. Also, do you even know what it takes to make that pair of jeans? That shirt- the labor? The resources? Three, because if someone else pays for you to do your clothes shopping and they’re strapped for cash like a lot of people are it’s incredibly selfish and unnecessary to go pay a shit ton of money at basic ass clothing stores like Hollister. 

Also you know, if you shop at certain thrift stores you’re totally helping out local people and the local economy. 

I, personally, have bought a lot of my clothes at a thrift store that does things like host local artists in a lobby area, hosts free wifi for the community, gives away kids books and sells other books for super cheap, and helps give a lot of people in dire situations some decent clothes. Thrift stores do actually have a lot of good stuff too. I just recently found theeee cutest blazer for like five dollars that would have normally been at least thirty, and two pairs of jeans that fit me just right for like three dollars each. 

And another thing- I don’t know anyone who throws away their clothes, but seriously- don’t do it. Donate your shit, okay. Just because you can’t sell it at a yard sale or give it to a relative doesn’t mean it’s worthless. You might not get something out of it yourself but someone else could.

Like, there is no reason to purposefully avoid a thrift store. They are some of the coolest shops around. Go donate, go shop, just go.

fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

The US government’s drone program in Pakistan “terrorizes” local communities, kills large numbers of civilians and drives anti-American fervor in the country, a new study by the law schools of Stanford and New York University finds.

The study, titled “Living Under Drones,” finds that Pakistanis living in affected areas are afraid to attend public gatherings such as weddings and funerals as ground operators that guide the unmanned aircraft frequently mistake them as groups of al-Qaeda-linked fighters.

“Their presence terrorizes men, women, and children, giving rise to anxiety and psychological trauma among civilian communities,” the study reads. “Those living under drones have to face the constant worry that a deadly strike may be fired at any moment, and the knowledge that they are powerless to protect themselves.”

It adds: “These fears have affected behavior. The US practice of striking one area multiple times, and evidence that it has killed rescuers, makes both community members and humanitarian workers afraid or unwilling to assist injured victims.”

The study is based on interviews with victims, witnesses, humanitarian workers and medical professionals compiled over a nine-month period.

(via ausetkmt)

unconsumption:

We’re fans of free book exchanges, like the Little Free Libraries; the now-defunct-phone-booths-turned-mini-libraries (here, here, here, here, and here); shelves in London Tube and train stations and in airports that enable travelers to swap books; former newspaper racks; and a 1979 Ford transformed into a bookmobile from which free books are distributed in Buenos Aires, among others, that spring up in public spaces. 
(We’re also fond of more traditional libraries that are housed in non-traditional settings like repurposed old buses and historic barns and churches.)
And now in Paris, there’s this communal book exchange sitting atop a tree cage: 

Strasbourg-based street artist Florian Rivière is back with a new, neat urban intervention! Last weekend, Rivière installed a little library on a sidewalk near Gare du Nord … .

I don’t know if that’s a pallet or a crate (or both), but I like it!
See a couple of Riviere’s other urban interventions, a.k.a., “hacktions,” here.
(via Urban Hacktivist Launches Street Library — The Pop-Up City)

unconsumption:

We’re fans of free book exchanges, like the Little Free Libraries; the now-defunct-phone-booths-turned-mini-libraries (here, here, here, here, and here); shelves in London Tube and train stations and in airports that enable travelers to swap books; former newspaper racks; and a 1979 Ford transformed into a bookmobile from which free books are distributed in Buenos Aires, among others, that spring up in public spaces. 

(We’re also fond of more traditional libraries that are housed in non-traditional settings like repurposed old buses and historic barns and churches.)

And now in Paris, there’s this communal book exchange sitting atop a tree cage: 

Strasbourg-based street artist Florian Rivière is back with a new, neat urban intervention! Last weekend, Rivière installed a little library on a sidewalk near Gare du Nord … .

I don’t know if that’s a pallet or a crate (or both), but I like it!

See a couple of Riviere’s other urban interventions, a.k.a., “hacktions,” here.

(via Urban Hacktivist Launches Street Library — The Pop-Up City)

unconsumption:


Awesome use of a defunct telephone box as a local communal book swap. Brüner Bücherkiste (by photojennic).

See also: Earlier Unconsumption posts on old phone booths used for new purposes.

unconsumption:

Awesome use of a defunct telephone box as a local communal book swap. Brüner Bücherkiste (by photojennic).

See also: Earlier Unconsumption posts on old phone booths used for new purposes.

Look @ The Benefits of Buying Local - Lets Do It

(Click to enlarge)

Why Buy Local Infographic
Source: eLocal.com