This is for those who wonder why - Please BOOST the Education

This is a REPOST From stuff white people do

suddenly get interested in non-white people whenever halloween comes around

Do any of the following four images strike you as a racist way for a white person to celebrate Halloween?


















Each of these images includes white people celebrating Halloween by connecting with other races. Or rather, with ideas of other races. Of course, the photo with the Obama pumpkin would seem entirely non-racist to most Americans (unless, perhaps, they’re Republicans). That’s because it’s the only one where white people aren’t dressed up as people of other races.

So among the other three photos above of various white folks in racial drag, is any one of them more racist than the other two (assuming you think that any of them are racist)?

I would bet that for most white Americans, the image of the three blackened white boys seems the most wrong. And for some, the only one that’s wrong. That one is pretty widely recognizable as an example of the old-fashioned, denigrated entertainment practice of “blackface.” That thing that got Ted Danson in trouble back in the day, during … what was it?

Oh right, a roast, for Whoopi Goldberg:


Ted Danson
Friars Club Roast (1993)



If the other two get-ups depicted above—the “Indian Brave" and the "Geisha"—don’t seem as racist to a lot of white people as the one depicting blackface "wiggers,” why is that? Why is it that blackface is more clearly wrong, while redface or yellowface are okay, or else, not as wrong?

What about Halloween parties that have racial themes? Do you think those are wrong? Like the “ghetto fabulous" or "tacos and tequila" parties that occur on college campuses? And in people’s living rooms?




It’s been my experience that when white folks are questioned about such Halloween choices, they usually brush off any allegations of racism with the claim that it’s all just good, harmless fun. The implication is that they don’t intend to be racist, and therefore, they’re not. Never mind any actual effects of their actions.

But if those are “all in good fun,” then how about a houseful of white folks throwing something called a “lynching party”? Would that be any different, or worse?

Actually, I wonder if that’s what these young good ol’ boys at Auburn University called this Halloween party:




So what do you think? Where do you draw the line on these things?

If you see anyone dressed up like a stereotype this Halloween, do you plan to say anything to them?

On that last point, how would the following idea work for you?

If you meet a white friend or acquaintance who’s dressed up like a member of some other race or ethnic group, you could say this to them: "Wow, what a concept! Where’d you get the idea of dressing up like a racist dipshit?"

classymissmolassy:

3-D Pumpkin Cookie Recipe & Tutorial.
25/365: Frightfully Delightful Detachable Collar Tutorial

indyheart:

After slaving over a zillion costumes, I barely had time to put mine together.  I didn’t want to spend a ton of time cobbling something together, so after looking through my closet and rejecting the old standbys (Zatana, Red shirt, 60s housewife), I decided to revisit my youth and transform myself into Wednesday Addams!  I grabbed a black dress, black thigh high stockings, black granny boots, my Zatana wig, and then realized I needed one more thing — a collar!  Sewing skills to the rescue.

Here’s a tutorial in case you want to make yourself a swanky detachable collar.  Peter pan collars are adorable, so jazz up your outfit and sew yourself one or ten!

1. Grab a dress or shirt as a pattern.  Find the center, place a pin to mark the center, then using tracing paper, lightly outline half of the collar.  2. Using the outline you made as a guide, shape the collar to look the way you’d like (make it pointy like I did, make it bigger, scalloped, what have you)  3. Using a ruler, add a seam allowance all the way around (I add a 1/4” seam allowance).  4.  Do the same thing with the back side of your collar.  5.  Attach the front and back pieces using sticky tape.  6. Mark your pattern on your fabric  7. Cut out your pattern from the fabric (x 2)  8. Optional, but recommended for a nicer shape: Cut out pattern from your interface (x1)

9. Iron interface to fabric  10. Attach fasteners to the fabric (hook and eye or ribbons, your choice) 11. Pin fabrics, right sides together 12. Sew all the way around, leaving a 3” or so gap for turning the fabric  13. Use shearing scissors to cut down the seam allowance, nip all corners, clip curves  14. Turn piece  15. Iron  16. Topstitch around the edge (optional) and then, TA-DA!  Enjoy your swanky collar!  

Hope you enjoy the tutorial!  Toodles daaaahlings!

brightnest:

7 Fun Things to Do with Your Old Pumpkin via BrightNest
chronicstumbler:

[DIY]
alfabettezoupe:

DIY In the Woods Paper Lanterns
(via Funtober)
mybohemiansummer:

DIY- Crochet Mini Mouse Ears
This is a great last minute costume idea.  These cute ears took me about 30-45 minutes, and that was only because I would stop to chat with the munchkin.
I got the pattern from All About Ami. Her crochet creations are incredible!  I did do some modifications (as I always do).  The mods that I did were these:
For munchkin size ears I did only 24 stitches in the last round
I crocheted the two ear pieces together verses sewing them
I made 6 rows of stitches for the bow (I think it was because of the yarn I used)
   

Happy Hooking!
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mybohemiansummer:

DIY- Crochet Mini Mouse Ears

This is a great last minute costume idea.  These cute ears took me about 30-45 minutes, and that was only because I would stop to chat with the munchkin.

I got the pattern from All About Ami. Her crochet creations are incredible!  I did do some modifications (as I always do).  The mods that I did were these:

  • For munchkin size ears I did only 24 stitches in the last round
  • I crocheted the two ear pieces together verses sewing them
  • I made 6 rows of stitches for the bow (I think it was because of the yarn I used)

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truebluemeandyou:

DIY Kill Bill Inspired Trench Coat Video Tutorial from Dare to DIY here. Top Photo: Kill Bill photo, Bottom Photo: Screenshot from Dare to DIY Video.

halloweencrafts:

DIY Last Minute Costume Idea: Binders Full of Women from Brit + Co here. More costumes at the link. 
halloweencrafts:

DIY Snake Shirt with Template Tutorial from Country Living here.
truebluemeandyou:

Design Your Own Tattoo Tights (tights on the bottom are the ones in the tutorial). Practical advice and tutorial from swawesome on Craftster here. Other photos of tights used as inspiration from The Berry here.

truebluemeandyou:

Design Your Own Tattoo Tights (tights on the bottom are the ones in the tutorial). Practical advice and tutorial from swawesome on Craftster here. Other photos of tights used as inspiration from The Berry here.

superslyskillzmcfly:

You can turn anything into an oil lamp with a glass wick holder! This is just beautiful. I’m going to have to get a bunch of these in different sizes, and not just for Halloween. I bet they would great in beakers and other lab glassware. Halloween is going to cost me a fortune next year. 
This picture is from a tutorial on how to make this (the one on the left):

superslyskillzmcfly:

You can turn anything into an oil lamp with a glass wick holder! This is just beautiful. I’m going to have to get a bunch of these in different sizes, and not just for Halloween. I bet they would great in beakers and other lab glassware. Halloween is going to cost me a fortune next year. 

This picture is from a tutorial on how to make this (the one on the left):

Skull Oil Lamp

lallitara:

Old Skool Papier Mache: A How To Guide
Supplies: aluminum foil, scissors, tape, newspapers, flour, paintbrush, paints
Step 1: Get several layers of heavy duty aluminum slightly bigger than your face (4-5 layers)
Step 2: Contour the foil to your face, making note of where your eyes and nose (or snout) will be
Step 3a: For masks with extra ears and snouts, I found it easier to make these accoutrements separately and tape them to your completed face mold. Cut out your eyes so you’ll have a rough sense of where they’ll go
Step 3b: When your base is done, it’s time for the paste. Boil 1 part of flour to 5 parts of water. I just used a ladle—no need to make a science of it. The end result is a thick gooey, gluey substance. This is how Grandma makes glue! Oh, also don’t forget to tear yourself lots of strips of newspaper (I used a Trader Joe’s flyer)
Step 4: Dip strips in gluey substance, and lay over your mask. As the strips will be wet and heavy, your mold may start losing its shape a bit. I used some scrap aluminum foil to ensure things were standing upright. After one layer, it is best to wait for it to dry. Continue the next day. 
Step 5: After 3-4 layers of paper, and your mask is a nice and stiff, paint it up! You can go traditional or you can check out these Japanese Kitsune masks for some other ideas.
Good luck! I’ll be posting my end result as soon as it’s dry…
— jz

lallitara:

Old Skool Papier Mache: A How To Guide

Supplies: aluminum foil, scissors, tape, newspapers, flour, paintbrush, paints

Step 1: Get several layers of heavy duty aluminum slightly bigger than your face (4-5 layers)

Step 2: Contour the foil to your face, making note of where your eyes and nose (or snout) will be

Step 3a: For masks with extra ears and snouts, I found it easier to make these accoutrements separately and tape them to your completed face mold. Cut out your eyes so you’ll have a rough sense of where they’ll go

Step 3b: When your base is done, it’s time for the paste. Boil 1 part of flour to 5 parts of water. I just used a ladle—no need to make a science of it. The end result is a thick gooey, gluey substance. This is how Grandma makes glue! Oh, also don’t forget to tear yourself lots of strips of newspaper (I used a Trader Joe’s flyer)

Step 4: Dip strips in gluey substance, and lay over your mask. As the strips will be wet and heavy, your mold may start losing its shape a bit. I used some scrap aluminum foil to ensure things were standing upright. After one layer, it is best to wait for it to dry. Continue the next day. 

Step 5: After 3-4 layers of paper, and your mask is a nice and stiff, paint it up! You can go traditional or you can check out these Japanese Kitsune masks for some other ideas.

Good luck! I’ll be posting my end result as soon as it’s dry…

— jz

davidleonmorgan:


It’s Queen Zoé! Check out my first DIY tutorial feature on Etsy, featuring my adorable goddaughter. Learn how to make a simple paper crown just like hers.

davidleonmorgan:

It’s Queen Zoé! Check out my first DIY tutorial feature on Etsy, featuring my adorable goddaughter. Learn how to make a simple paper crown just like hers.